Get to know Ole Willy McLane

Aye! Allow me to introduce you to Ole Willy McLane, the man, the myth, the malty Scottish legend. Pint-sized, dark and handsome, he was brewed with British malt and East Kent Goldings hops which provide a wee bit of hop flavor for an eclectic taste of the Scottish countryside. Sip a cold Ole Willy and you will be instantly transported to your happy place, which for Ole Willy is a chilly blizzard afternoon with unlimited college football on the tube and his miniature poodle, Belinda, lounging by his side.

We dub Ole Willy a +/- 80 Shilling style, named for the tax placed on him in the old country just because of his alcohol level. And because, well, he told us to do it and you don’t mess with Ole Willy McLane. Sit around ye old bar and you will hear legendary tales of Ole Willy flipping cars with a mere pinky finger and

Ole Willy McLane Scottish Ale

fighting an army of Scottish thugs by himself. And don’t you dare call him “ole” to his face, many a lad has gotten his front teeth knocked out from a swing from Ole Willy after the word slipped from their lips. Legend has it that Ole Willy even scuffled with Chuck Norris…and won.

But alas! There is a softer side of Ole Willy that most lads and lassies think is a mere myth, but it is most indeed the truth. Ole Willy’s hops and malt are nicely balanced with hints of rich chocolate and toffee notes, combining together for a tune as harmonic as a Scottish bagpipe symphony. Ole Willy enjoys long walks on the beach, candlelight dinners, and romantic comedies. His wit and charm have won over lassies from Scotland to South Dakota.

So, put on your finest kilt and hurry on over to Lineage and try a pint of our mighty Ole Willy McLane. Guaranteed to give you immeasurable strength, impeccable wit and legendary style…just like Ole Willy.

Ole Willy McLane is a +/- 80 Shilling Scottish Ale

ABV  5.4%

IBU  19

Available in the Lineage Brewing pub now!

Why the Hand Pies?

Lineage Brewing’s Food Vision

Why the hand pies?

I grew up making empanadas with my family and it turns out that you can pretty much put whatever tasty goods you want into an empanada. You can also find something similar in all kinds of cultures. They may have a different name for it, but goodies inside a pastry crust is the perfect concept and has been a tradition for people across the globe. You might know them as Pasties, Samosas, Empanadas, Panzerotti, or Hand pies. When you can put your food in one hand and your beer in the other, it just seemed like the perfect pairing.

We didn’t invent the hand pie but we brought the first savory hand pie to Clintonville and have endeavored to make it a culinary delicacy. Mimicry is the best flattery, and it seems that we’ve started a trend around Columbus. But at Lineage you won’t find flavors like this anywhere else – our kitchen staff use pastry as a canvas for all of the house made fillings and dipping sauces that align to the season. Some items that have hit our taste buds so far:  Indian inspired samosa, a delectable

Banh Mi Pie

Banh Mi Pie

duck confit, a meaty banh mi pork meatball, a cheesy spinach pie, a summery ratatouille, a pot roast pie, Indian spiced spinach paneer, reuben pie, goat cheddar cheese pie, chicken pot pie, a butternut squash pie, a chicken empanada with ajii, and a breakfast hand pie. Not to mention the dessert pies that cure your sweet tooth: pecan pie, lemon curd, banana nut with chocolate pudding. It’s hard to decide, so get a variety of two-handed pies to share and fill your belly. Check out our current food menu.

They are all made to order fresh out of the oven right in Lineage Brewing’s kitchen.
Nom-nom-nom….

Show your Irish Lineage

Finally, a day that we all can pretend to be Irish!

With St. Patrick’s Day just a few days away, we thought we would take the time to shine some light on two of our Irish style brews we will be pouring in honor of the day.

Loughran’s Irish Stout

First up is Loughran’s Dry Irish Stout.  Pronounced (lock-ran). This beer is a traditional dry Irish stout, it is roast forward with notes of coffee and a bit of toasted malt. This stout is only served on nitrogen, giving it a wonderful light and creamy mouthfeel.

The Irish stout is without a doubt the most popular Irish style beer.  Stouts are an off-shoot of the Porter family tree.  The word “stout” was first used in 1677 to refer to a stronger version of the Porter style.  The use of “stout” in the context of strength continued on through the 1800’s. 

The appearance of our dry stout is simply lovely.  The color is almost a jet black.  It is served on nitrogen, so after you have patiently waited for that perfect pour, it should have a beautifully fluffy tan head sitting at the top of your pint glass.

As for aromas, the Loughran’s stout is roast forward with notes of coffee coming from the roasted barely, and a bit of toasted malt. Dry stouts can have slight offerings of chocolate, cocoa, or very slight graininess present.

Rory’s Rayge

Next up is Rory’s Rayge our Irish Red Ale.  This beer is named after owners Mike and Jess Byrne’s beloved Whippet, Rory.  Also, local bicycle advocate Ray George. This Irish Red is a touch bigger than a traditional Irish Red Ale. Our take is full of toasted, biscuit flavors and notes of toffee in the finish for an all around well-balanced beer.

Traditionally, Irish red ales are red variations on typical English and Irish ales.  Surprisingly enough, Irish Red Ales have not had a huge impact in Ireland’s current beer market where Stouts, Porters and Lagers are more popular.  The Irish Red’s darker “cousin” the dry Irish Stout will continue to be the most popular amongst its family.

The appearance of Rory’s Rayge is probably much like you would anticipate, it’s amber to deep-reddish in color. Clean finish.  Easy drinking ale with a reddish hue.

Cask

Thursday’s Cask is going to be our blonde stout Oscura Obscura with cinnamon and vanilla, served on the beer engine.

Friday, March 17

So come on down to Lineage Friday 11am to 1am.  Wear your green.  Our kitchen will be open until 10 pm so be sure to grab yourself a Reuben hand pie, your favorite pint and an Irish Car Bomb. We’ll have live music outside from 4-5pm and then again from 6-9pm as part of Givin O’ the Green to the CRC.  You’re not going to want to miss this Irish fun!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Sláinte!

Proud to be Small Independent Craft Beer

It’s America, we know people like to celebrate BIG, but we want to take some time to celebrate SMALL independent craft beer. We are proud to be one of the small businesses locally owned by the people and faces you see working there every day. We call that being Independent Craft Beer.Lineage Brewing Independent Craft Beer

At Lineage Brewing, we are a team of 15 – no suits, no big investors. Our close knit Lineage team is like family. We are just 4 owners and we all live, work, and play in our Clintonville neighborhood. As owners of a small brewery in Columbus, OH, we also brew every batch of beer that hits your lips. This is our love and our craft. Staying small means we get to continue to do what we love and grow at our own pace.

Independent craft beer owners of Lineage Brewing

Lineage Brewing Owners

We are a 7 BBL brewpub, which means we can brew a lot of styles, the beer is always fresh, and we can see our customers’ reactions across the bar. People ask all the time, “Will you ever package”? Someday we might, but when the time is right.

We make all our food from scratch. We use fresh ingredients and develop all recipes with the same heart and soul that we put into our beer. We make everything to order and slow-baked to deliver unique comfort food that pairs well with beer.

Why are we so proud to be small and independent craft beer?

We love being involved in our community and neighborhood.

We know your name and you know ours.

We make what we are passionate about and what our customers want.

We like change. Change, for us, happens constantly. We don’t ask permission, we just make it happen.

Everyone has a voice. All team members provide input into what we do and how we do it every day.

We grow at our own pace and in ways that make us stronger.

There is a lot of BIG craft beer out there. Let’s celebrate SMALL beer too. Celebrate Independent Craft by looking for the Independent Craft Brewer Seal, as you do so, feel good that you are supporting your local businesses, culture, friends, community, craftsmen, neighbors, and city (local economic growth).

Learn more about the Independent Craft Brewer Seal.

Independently Owned.

Carefully Crafted.

…and staying Small and Beautiful since 2015

Not a SPORTSBALL fan? How about Books, Board games, and Banter

It’s that time of year…Sportsball season. It’s an exciting and fun time to support our Buckeyes and it does seem like the entire city turns scarlet and gray this time of year.

There are some of us that need to escape the crowds once in awhile though. We are in search for a slower pace and the company of good conversation. It is unfortunate to be sitting at the bar with a friend, and answer “What?, I’m sorry I was distracted by the 3 football games, and the 1997 movie classic, Anaconda, that is playing above the bar and I didn’t hear you.”

There are so many distractions in life these days. From the overstimulation of traffic and the mass crowds on High Street to the constant buzzing, dinging and the need to

Books and Battleship

Books and Battleship

document your life experiences on your smartphone. We all need some time to relax. It is Labor Day weekend, which means take a break. Take a break from the noise, the fast-paced bustle, and for some of us, Sportsball.

We are Buckeye fans, Crew fans, and Blue Jacket fans, too, but sometimes when you want to have a good beer you need your senses in tack. Lineage Brewing keeps the beer flowing but a chill atmosphere for books, board games, and banter. No flashing TV lights and Sportsball noise, just good beer and good fun.

Beer and Jenga

Beer and Jenga

For those Sportsball fans out there, we are still rooting for our teams and enjoy the celebration before the games and after. You can even get your Lineage Beer TO GO for your tailgates. Weekender Happy Hour is on Saturdays from 11am-2pm, get $12 growler fills. 

 

Cheers! And no matter what your affection, stay Ohio proud. O – H… I – O

Summer Belgian Beer Series (Trappist, Abbeys and Farmhouse, Oh My!)

It’s been a nice hot summer and we are introducing our Belgian beer style series. The series, which will roll out throughout the summer, began with Hall Pass, our Abbey Single, and now Nova Scuti, our Belgian Blonde. Still to come will be a Belgian Tripel and our Belgian Wit, Strunk and Witte.   

Belgian Beer

Belgian Beer

Uniquely Belgian

Belgium is a relatively small country that has created a diverse selection of beers. Take for example the following Belgium beer styles that have come out of Belgium.  There are Trappist Beers (Singles, Dubbels, Tripels), Abbey Beers (Blondes, Pales, Golden Strong Ales, Dark Strong Ales), Farmhouse Beers (Saisons, Grisettes) and Sour Beers (Lambics, Gueuzes, Flanders Reds, Oud Bruins). It’s a country where until recently brewers brewed to their region’s palates and, perhaps because of this regional focus, these varied styles have persisted.

Map of Belgium

Belgium Map

For this post,we are focusing on our Belgian Abbey/Trappist series along with a quick plug for the  Farmhouse/Wit beers we’ve done.  Let’s sit down on the grass, crack a growler of Hall Pass, and get down to business.  

So what are Trappist, Abbey and Farmhouse beers?

Abbey Style Ales

Trappist beers aren’t so much of a style as they are an AOC (appellation d’origine contrôlée aka controlled designation of origin).  Clear as mud, right?  Well, you know how Champagne can only be called Champagne if it comes from that region in France?  Same thing is true for Trappist beers, but Trappist beers must be brewed within the boundaries of a monastery. Up until recently, there were seven Trappist breweries: six are in Belgium and one is in the Netherlands. With the rising tide that is craft Belgium beer, we have seen four more open around the world. So what’s a brewery that’s not in a monastery to do when they make a Trappist-style ale?  Call it an Abbey style ale.

Abbey style ales are not a single style but a category of Belgium beer that is brewed by commercial breweries but share properties of Trappist beers.  Just to clarify, Trappist breweries can and do brew what were once considered Abbey-style beers like Blonde Ales and commercial breweries brew Trappist styles like tripels.  Confused yet?  

Farmhouse Ales

Our Belgian Summer series of beers all fall into the Abbey category, while our Saisons (Allumé and Ombre Noir) and our Wit (Strunk & Witte) fall into another category, the Farmhouse ale.

Generally when someone says “Farmhouse Ale,” what they probably mean is “Saison.”  I feel like Saison is a style that people like to put in a corner. (Nobody puts Saison in the corner!).  There’s really so much more to Saison than being straw colored and highly effervescent with spicy/citrus notes.  Saisons can be straw colored, amber hued, or black as night.  They can be citrusy and spicy, dark and spicy, or oddly fruity.  It’s not so much a style as it’s a catch-all. Enough on the styles: let’s crack open that other growler of Nova Scuti and talk about what we are offering this summer.

What’s coming to the Lineage Pub?

Belgian Beer: Hall Pass

Belgian Beer: Hall Pass

Abbey Single –  An Abbey single, aka Patersbier, is a table beer meant for monks to drink on daily basis.  Most Trappist breweries make one that is a lower alcohol version of their flagship beers.  For example, Chimay’s Abbey Single’ called Doree’ is a lower alcohol version of their Dubbel. Westmalles Abbey Single is a lower alcohol version of their tripel.  Lineage Brewing’s Hall Pass follows Chimays route by using a Dubbel as a blueprint, but using the Ardennes yeast strain instead of the Chimay strain.  It’s malty, slightly fruity and infinitely drinkable on a hot summer day. 

Belgian Beer: Nova Scuti

Belgian Beer: Nova Scuti

Belgian Blonde – A Belgian blonde is golden colored, has light spicy mixed with light fruity aromas, and is lower in alcohol and sweeter than a tripel. Our Nova Scuti uses pilsner and Munich malts and a small amount sugar to dry out the beer. We deviated slightly from the norm by adding a bunch of Australian Galaxy hops at flame out. The hop addition didn’t add bitterness but it did add some wonderful juicy tropical fruit notes that work well with our Ardennes yeast.

Belgian Tripel – The Belgian tripel was first created and popularized by Westmalle. It’s straw in color, high in alcohol (close to 10%), yet easy to drink due to the sugar added to lighten the body. The last beer in our summer Belgian series will be a traditional tripel with the exception that our yeast is different than what Westmalle uses. The beer is almost entirely Pilsner malt with sugar added to lighten the body and if the stars align should come in a little over 10% ABV.

Belgian Beer: Strunk & Witte

Belgian Beer: Strunk & Witte

Belgian Witbier- Who doesn’t love a good wheat beer with some citrus and coriander added to it?  Wit (or witte) was originally brewed in Hoegaarden and nearly disappeared until a postman named Pierre Celis brought it back from the grave. Belgian Witte is a hazy straw colored beer that has wonderful spicy yeast aromas/flavors mixed with citrus from either crushed coriander or citrus zest. Our version, Strunk & Witte, is relatively traditional, except that we use some acidulated malt to tart up the beer along with crushed coriander and the zest from oranges and lemons.  Look for it sometime in mid-August.

Belgian Beer: Allumé

Belgian Beer: Allumé

Saison- Last year we did a black saison called Ombres Noir and a more traditional Saison called Allumé. Ombres Noir was dark like a stout but had a nice floral/mineral quality derived from the yeast. These yeast flavors and aromas were then paired with black cardamom to add an alluring smokey-spicy quality to the beer. Allumé, our more traditional Saison, was straw in color, effervescent with the same floral/mineral quality found in Ombres Noir.

 

If you want to try out a few, come in for a sampler, or get a nice tall beer. These are thoroughly enjoyable after a hard day’s work or on a hot Ohio day. You don’t have to be in Belgium to appreciate what the Belgians have done for beer.

 

References

“BJCP Style Guidelines.” 2016. Beer Judge Certification Program.  http://www.bjcp.org/stylecenter.php.

Hieronymus, Stan. 2005. Brew like a monk: Trappist, Abbey and strong Belgian ales and how to brew them : culture and craftmanship in the Belgian tradition. Boulder, Colo: Brewers. http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/474704435

“The History of Belgian Beer.” 2012. Global Beer. http://www.globalbeer.com/content/history-belgian-beer.

Markowski, Phil. 2004. Farmhouse ales culture and craftsmanship in the Belgian tradition. Boulder, Colo: Brewers Publications. http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/689920626

Rajotte, Pierre. 1992. Belgian ale. Boulder, Colo: Brewers Publications.  http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/27187478

 

Lineage Brewing is 1 Year Old!

A Year in Review

It is hard to believe that it’s been a whole year already for our brewery. The year flew by so fast for us. We’ve put it all out there and are thrilled that Columbus has had such a thirst for more. In total, Lineage Brewery has produced 37 different beer styles this year, not to mention some fun casks every Thursday.

Where did we start?

With 8 taps, 2 beer engines, 4 fermenters, and one brewer.

Where are we now?

14 taps, 2 beer engines, 5 fermenters (plus 1 more on its way), a brewer and assistant brewer.

We’ve been excited to bring a larger food menu and brunch hours to the brewery in 2016 and we plan to bring even more delicious beers to the table as well.

A Full Year Beer List

1) Spaceship # 6 :American IPA

2) Grab It by the Husk: Coconut Porter

3) Shoot-the-Chutes: Cream Ale

4) Bricky Briffon: English Bitter

5) Ole Willy McClane: Scottish Ale

6) Scàrale: Blackberry American Wheat

7) Arm Buster: American Stout

8) Ryemora: Rye Pale Ale

9) Aunt Bernice: Berliner Weisse

10) Mr. Manager: American Pale Ale

11) Touche De Gris: Grisette

12) Allumé: French Farmhouse Saison

13) Exosphere: Double IPA

14) Benrath: Düsseldorff  Altbier

15) Eldrax: Foreign Extra Stout

16) Beechwold Brown: English Brown Ale

17) Strunk & Witte: Belgian Style White Ale

18) Fiddle & Fife: American Style Bitter

19) Trail Day APA: American Pale Ale

20) Ombres Noir: Black Saison

21) Peter’s Propensity: Pumpkin Ale

22) Mrs. Baylock: Robust Porter

23) Kimmy Gibbler: San Francisco Lager

24) The Utah: English Mild

25) Midnight Sickle: Russian Imperial Stout

26) FestCbus: Holiday Ale

27) Vilkati: Baltic Porter

28) Wholly Cran: Citrus Cranberry Wheat

29) Loughran’s: Dry Irish Stout

30) Rory’s Rayge: Red Irish Ale

31) Walhalla at Me: American Pale Ale

32) Going Ham: DIPA

33) Passionate Bernice: Berliner Weisse with Guava and Passion fruit

34) Stop 18: German Pilsner

35) The Mother of Summer: American Wheat with Lemon, Coriander, and Peppercorn

36) Bertok: Oatmeal Stout

37) Anniversary Brett Beer

Check out our year in review…

The Brewery

The Brewery

Third Thursdays with the Clintonville-Beechwold CRC

Third Thursdays with the Clintonville-Beechwold CRC

Beer Festivals and great volunteers

Beer Festivals and great volunteers

Homebrew competitions and beer judging

Homebrew competitions and beer judging

Helping our neighbors celebrate milestones

Helping our neighbors celebrate milestones

Sharing some Kimmy Gibbler with the real Kimmy Gibbler

Sharing some Kimmy Gibbler with the real Kimmy Gibbler

Freshly roasted just for the beer

Freshly roasted just for the beer

Ray Ray's hogs enjoying our spent grain

Ray Ray’s hogs enjoying our spent grain

Our brewery spokesdog

Our brewery spokesdog

The brewery's new van

The brewery’s new van

Beer documentary series

Beer documentary series

A silver medal for our English Mild

A silver medal for our English Mild

Barrel Aging

Barrel Aging

Celebrating St. Paddy's Day at the brewery

Celebrating St. Paddy’s Day at the brewery

A visit to Anderson Farms

A visit to Anderson Farms

Bikes and beer, COMBO brew day

Bikes and beer, COMBO brew day

Beer classes at the brewery

Beer classes at the brewery

International Womens' Collaboration Brew Day

International Womens’ Collaboration Brew Day

Central Ohio Craft Beer Brewsters unite for International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day

Historically, women have brewed beer for the masses for centuries. Despite this, the craft beer industry is vastly associated with the male gender.

Historically, women have brewed beer for the masses for centuries. Despite this, the craft beer industry is vastly associated with the male gender.

Women in the Ohio Craft Beer Industry Unite

Don’t be fooled by the boys’ clubs or advertising messages that disregard the female market. Today, women make up a 1/3 of all craft beer drinkers across the United States. The number of women involved in the craft brewing industry is growing by the minute. In fact, 21% of U.S. breweries now have at least one woman in a top ranking role of brewmaster, head brewer, or CEO.

Jessica Byrne and Jessica Page, owners of Lineage Brewing, are teaming up with Lineage Account Rep, Nichole Endicott to host their first International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day on March 8, 2016. These women are brewing craft beer in collaboration with another female brewer and brewery owner, Lori Wince from Weasel Boy Brewing Co. in Zanesville, OH. Lineage and Weasel Boy collaborated to craft the recipe, and they are excited to offer it on-tap in both of their tap rooms this Spring. Both breweries will announce the dates of both tapping parties on their Facebook pages.

“There aren’t too many of us (professional women craft brewers) in the Central Ohio area. We’d like to make it known that we are women-owned breweries. We are proud to carve out a place for women in this industry,” says Jessica Byrne.

They have also invited other women from the Central Ohio craft beer industry to take part, including Jennie Koeper, Account Rep from Zaftig and Jennifer Hermann, Assistant Brewer for Weasel Boy. These ladies all started as home brewers and now these great minds and muscle will participate in the craft brew day on March 8, 2016, mashing in at 8:00am.

“I’m really excited to work with the women at Lineage Brewing on this collaboration,” said Lori Wince, assistant brewer and co-owner of Weasel Boy Brewing Co. “It will be a wonderful sharing experience. I look forward to learning more from the women at Lineage, other women working at Central Ohio breweries, and local female home brewers on brew day. It will be nice to talk to them about our craft beer industry and share experiences and successes.” says Lori.

What is International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day?  IWCBD

International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day (IWCBD) was started by Sophie de Ronde in England in 2014. IWCBD was designed for camaraderie and to encourage women to brew craft beer together socially on March 8th each year. Participants from across the globe all brew on the same day and upload and tag their photos on the IWCBD Facebook page.

See who is participating from around the world on this map

Lineage plans to donate a portion of each pint sold in their pub to the Pink Boots Society. The Pink Boots Society empowers women beer professionals to advance their careers through beer education. This society also offers scholarships and other opportunities so that women can achieve their dreams. 

The ladies will brew an American style wheat ale with lemon zest and peppercorn. This collaborative craft beer will be ready to drink this Spring, just in time for warmer weather.

IMG_1990

Craft beer brewers pictured: (left) Jessica Byrne, Owner of Lineage Brewing, (top right) Nichole Endicott, Account Rep for Lineage Brewing, (bottom right) Lori Wince, Owner of Weasel Boy Brewing Co.

 Weasel Boy Brewing is owned by husband and wife team, Lori and Jay Wince. They are located at 126 Muskingum Ave, Zanesville, OH 43701 weaselboybrewing.com

Top 5 Reasons we are THANKFUL for Clintonville

Clintonville: gem of Columbus, OH

Clintonville: gem of Columbus, OH

We LOVE Clintonville! This Thanksgiving, we are so thankful for the people, places, history, kindness, and charm that Clintonville brings to its inhabitants and neighbors. We are also thankful that Lineage Brewing can share in the local tradition by putting down roots in the heart of this community. Here’s our list of the top 5 reasons we are thankful for Clintonville, Ohio: 

  1. Homemade, homegrown, and local is what we live for.
  2. Quiet city living with strong community ties.
  3. Backyard brewing and gardening is where we got our start.
  4. Parks, trails, and trees remind us to stop and smell the roses and enjoy life.
  5. Big hearts and minds that bring together many talents in order to give back to others.

We send many thanks out to our Clintonville friends, family, and neighbors who have supported us through many obstacles. We look forward to continuing to strengthen our roots in this thriving community that we are proud to call home. Today is a reminder not to take for granted where your life has taken you, who you are able to share it with, and how you can continue to give back to others.

Have a Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Lineage!

BREWER’S WORD: What can be accomplished in half of a year? 6 Months, 23 Brews, 27 Casks= 50 different beer options

Mike Byrne, Brewmaster

Mike Byrne, Brewmaster

Mike Byrne’s Brewer’s Word

I brewed my first batch of beer almost nine years ago in my driveway. As a pretty serious home brewer, I had three goals: To learn as much as I could about brewing, brew as many different styles as I could, and brew the best beer possible.

When I took my first professional brewing position, I had two goals. First, I wanted to continue learning as much as I could. Second, I wanted to brew the best beer possible. I read more books, attended a workshop in Colorado Springs on yeast microbiology, attended professional conferences, and joined professional organizations. Slowly, I began to feel more comfortable in the brewery. I started tweaking recipes, brewing techniques, and procedures to improve beer quality and efficiency.

 As Lineage Brewing began to take shape, I reflected on two things. First, my experience in art school. I used to spend hours in the studio with my ear phones on creating study after study and experimenting with techniques and different mediums. Eventually my ideas would come together into the final piece for formal critique. (One of these works now hangs on the wall in our pub).

Second, I thought about all the places my wife, Jess, and I have traveled and the beer culture we have experienced. One city that really stood out to me was Grand Rapids, Michigan.  The beer culture there is incredible. There is a pride about local beer that can only be understood by experiencing it. It was so exciting to try the wide variety of styles found at many of these small breweries. Sure, everyone brewed an IPA, but why order that when I could try a mango gruit or potato lager or a well-brewed English mild. If you really want your mind blown, attend the Michigan Winter Beer Fest.

There are some pretty neat beers at that fest…Just make sure to wear your Sunday-best Carharts.

Lineage’s Brewing Philosophy

At Lineage, I have gone back to my original goals from nine years ago as a home brewer. I wanted to focus on different styles I’ve experienced in Grand Rapids and my practice from art school. To me, this is really the only way to learn about the nuances of yeast strains, flavor of raw materials, and the effects of different brewing techniques. beerlistphoto

So far, we have brewed 23 different styles (6 more scheduled), using 7 different yeast strains and a strain of bacteria at Lineage Brewing. If you are a frequent visitor to the brewpub, you will commonly see beers brewed in a series. What this means is that when I get a new yeast strain, I tend to brew at least 2-4 different styles with that strain. I do this to learn how the yeast changes over generations, how it performs at different temperatures, and how the flavor profile reacts with the ingredients.

This week marks our 6 month semi-anniversary, and in total, we’ve made 23 different styles and have had 27 different casks= 50 different beer options. Have you tried all 23 Lineage Brewing styles? How many can you name? Keep up by checking our website and following us on Facebook.

Cheers!

Mike